Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Sue Scheff: Teens Smoking - Tobacco Free Florida

Although we hear it a lot, smoking is bad for you, there are still many adults and kids that continue to smoke cigarettes. Parents will say that we need to pick and choose our issues with our teens, which is correct, however we cannot stop talking about the dangers of smoking tobacco.

In Florida, Tobacco Free Florida and Florida's Quitline are two organization directed at helping you and your loved ones quit smoking.

Unveiled in 2008 under the direction of the Florida Department of Health, the Tobacco Free Florida campaign seeks to decrease the number of tobacco users in the state of Florida through efforts aimed at both preventing nonusers from starting to use tobacco and encouraging current users to quit. These efforts are funded by money derived from court settlements against major tobacco companies, and include executions in the realm of Advertising, Public Relations, Interactive, Guerilla Media, Event Media, Sponsored Promotions and more.

It is their hope that one day every Floridian might be free of the hazards of tobacco, and that we all may eventually live in the paradise that our name implies- a truly Tobacco Free Florida.

Join Tobacco Free Florida on Facebook and stay up to date with events and information to educate you on the hazards of smoking.

Tobacco Free Florida Week runs March 21st-28th and all week long we're asking Floridians to help protect themselves and their loved ones from secondhand smoke (SHS) by asking the smokers in their life to, "Be Free For Me."

SWAT is Florida's statewide youth organization working to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize Big Tobacco. They are a united movement of empowered youth working towards a tobacco free future.

You can join a lot of different groups in high school. This video shows why SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) may be the most important.

Be an educated parent, you will have safer and healthier teens. Read more.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Sue Scheff: Support Teen that was nearly beaten to death - Join new Facebook support group

Are you as shocked and horrified at the events that happened to 15 year-old Josie Ratley as many of us are? Isn't it time this violence and bullying stopped?

Facebook has become one of the strongest social networking sites to help spread news, assist causes and bring people together with common interests. Recently "Pray for Josie Lou Ratley" group was created.

This group has been established to foster coordination, donations and positive actions on behalf of Josie and her Family. Please join them as they band together to right this terrible wrong!

Take the time to leave your good wishes, prayers and support.

Get Well Cards can be sent to:

Broward General Medical Center
Patient Josie Lou Ratley
1600 S. Andrews Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
954-355-4400

The Ratley family does not have health insurance to pay for Josie's medical care. You can donate at any Wachovia Bank branch or mail your donations to:

Wachovia Bank
2989 PGA Boulevard
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410.

Please make checks payable to "The Josie Lou Ratley Fund".

Every little bit helps and every pray is appreciated. Read more.

Watch slideshow with new photo's from her recent Facebook Group page.

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Sue Scheff: No Text is Worth Dying Over

AT&T recently launched a new campaign to raise awareness about the risks of texting and driving and remind all wireless consumers, especially youth, that text messages can – and should – wait until after driving.

The national campaign features true stories and the text message that was sent or received before someone’s life was altered, or even ended,because of texting and driving.

Stop what you’re doing. Take out your wireless device. Read out loud the last text message you received. Would reading or responding to that text message while driving be worth causing a serious accident? When you look at it that way, there’s no text that couldn’t wait.

AT&T* is launching today a new campaign to raise awareness about the risks of texting and driving and remind all wireless consumers, especially youth, that text messages can – and should – wait until after driving.

The national campaign features true stories and the text message that was sent or received before someone’s life was altered, or even ended, because of texting and driving. By featuring real stories, the campaign will demonstrate how insignificant a text message is compared to the potentially dire consequences of reading or responding while driving.

For example, in one of the television spots, the text “Where u at?” flashes on the screen and a mother says, “This is the text my daughter was reading when she drove into oncoming traffic.” The ad also includes the message “No text is worth dying over” and the campaign’s tagline, “Txtng & Drivng … It Can Wait.”

“We explored several campaign concepts but we didn’t have our ‘aha!’ moment until we asked one of our focus groups to take out their devices and read the last text they received,” said Cathy Coughlin, senior executive vice president and global marketing officer for AT&T. “When we asked if that particular message was worth the potential risk of reading while driving at 65 mph, you could have heard a pin drop. That’s when we realized the message ‘it can wait’ was effective in educating consumers about the dangers of texting while driving.”

The new campaign will span print, radio, TV and online advertising – which will be rolled out in the coming months – as well as in-store signage, collateral and online billing. In addition, parents, high school educators and, most importantly, youth, can now visit AT&T’s online resource center www.att.com/txtngcanwait . The site includes downloadable information about texting while driving such as a parent-teen pledge; a teen-teen pledge; a poster; a brochure; safety tips; and more.

AT&T also has launched a Facebook application, which can be found at www.facebook.com/att. Friends can share this application with one another to encourage each other to take the pledge to not text and drive. AT&T will also be promoting the pledge via a “twitition” on Twitter to ask followers to rally around the cause. You can follow @ShareATT on Twitter. In addition, to honor those taking the pledge, AT&T will contribute $250,000 to one or more non-profit organizations focused on youth safety and will announce the selected non-profit organization(s) at the start of National Youth Safety Month in May.

“While our campaign is important for all drivers, we’re particularly focused on youth,” said Coughlin.

In September 2009, AT&T announced a commitment to raise awareness about the issue of texting and driving through a multifaceted initiative to educate employees, customers and the general public about using wireless devices safely while driving.

Since then, AT&T has revised its wireless and motor vehicle policies to more clearly and explicitly prohibit texting and driving, impacting its approximately 280,000 employees; incorporated a don’t-text-and-drive message on the plastic clings that protect handset screens on the majority of new devices sold in AT&T’s more than 2,200 stores; and will integrate campaign messaging in AT&T catalogs, in-store signage and collateral, bills, e-mails, newsletters and more.

By using multiple touch points, AT&T expects the campaign to reach millions.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Sue Scheff: Fitsmi for Moms - Does your teen daughter struggle with her weight?

Fitsmi is a place for teen girls who are struggling with their weight and ready to make a change and they have now expanded into a place for parents to help their teens.  Here is a note from the founder who was recently featured on Dr. Oz.

Dear Moms (and Dads),

Welcome! My name is Linda Frankenbach and as a formerly overweight teen myself, I know how difficult it can be both to lose weight and to live with the social stigma that is so often an additional burden. So I founded Fitsmi.com, a website for teen girls struggling to lose weight, and a companion site, Fitsmi for Moms. Because when a teen decides to make a difference in her life, no one is in a better position to help her succeed than her mom.

Unfortunately, many moms feel helpless to affect change in their daughters' lives. They often blame themselves, encounter dubious advice and feel isolated. And with a fast-food joint on every corner, the world can seem stacked against them. But it doesn't have to be that way. We're here to help with tangible, teen-friendly changes, expert advice, illuminating blogs, good food strategies, and the occasional laugh or two. Best of all, at Fitsmi for Moms you can talk to moms just like you, who know how hard it can be to get their families on the right track. You are not alone.

Collectively, Fitsmi’s tools provide moms like you with a sense of empowerment to make a difference not only in their teen's life, but in their own. I am deeply excited to launch Fitsmi for Moms and hope you will join me to make this an ever-richer place for parents everywhere who care about raising a healthier generation.

Warm regards,

Linda Frankenbach

P.S. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to make Fitsmi or Fitsmi for moms better, please email us at fitsmiformoms@aol.com .

Fitsmi and Fitsmi for Moms are properties of Life180, Inc.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Sue Scheff: Teens Helping Teens Quit Smoking

Although we hear it a lot, smoking is bad for you, there are still many adults and kids that continue to smoke cigarettes. Parents will say that we need to pick and choose our issues with our teens, which is correct, however we cannot stop talking about the dangers of smoking tobacco.

In Florida, Tobacco Free Florida and Florida's Quitline are two organization directed at helping you and your loved ones quit smoking.

Unveiled in 2008 under the direction of the Florida Department of Health, the Tobacco Free Florida campaign seeks to decrease the number of tobacco users in the state of Florida through efforts aimed at both preventing nonusers from starting to use tobacco and encouraging current users to quit. These efforts are funded by money derived from court settlements against major tobacco companies, and include executions in the realm of Advertising, Public Relations, Interactive, Guerilla Media, Event Media, Sponsored Promotions and more.

It is their hope that one day every Floridian might be free of the hazards of tobacco, and that we all may eventually live in the paradise that our name implies- a truly Tobacco Free Florida.

Join Tobacco Free Florida on Facebook and stay up to date with events and information to educate you on the hazards of smoking.

Tobacco Free Florida Week runs March 21st-28th and all week long we're asking Floridians to help protect themselves and their loved ones from secondhand smoke (SHS) by asking the smokers in their life to, "Be Free For Me."

SWAT is Florida's statewide youth organization working to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize Big Tobacco. They are a united movement of empowered youth working towards a tobacco free future.

You can join a lot of different groups in high school. This video shows why SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) may be the most important.

Be an educated parent, you will have safer and healthier teens.

Monday, March 22, 2010

Sue Scheff: Teen Drivers - Click it or ticket!

It's the law, buckle your seat belt and demand your passengers click-it too! Many teens think they are invincible, it is up to the parents to stress the importance of seat belts. Seat belts save lives.

In Florida, traffic crashes take the lives of thousands of people a year. Most of those who die on the road are not buckled up.

With the busy Memorial Day weekend approaching and spring break is here, law enforcement agencies across Florida are once again joining the Click It or Ticket safety belt enforcement campaign.

During the crackdown, drivers and passengers will be ticketed if they are not buckled up. If children under 18 are not properly protected, the driver gets the ticket.

In 2007, an average of nine people a day died on Florida roads. So protect yourself, your family and your friends. Be sure that everyone on every trip buckles up.

And if you click it, you won't get a ticket.

Click It or Ticket is a cooperative effort of the Florida Department of Transportation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and law enforcement agencies across the state.

Click It or Ticket is the most successful safety belt enforcement campaign ever. Started by North Carolina in 1993, it has helped push the national safety belt rate to 82%. Since Florida joined the Click It or Ticket campaign in 2001, safety belt use has jumped 26%. In 2008, Florida's safety belt rate was 81.7%, up from 64.8% in 2000.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, every percentage point increase in safety belt use saves an estimated 270 lives.


Source: Click It or Ticket Florida

Be an educated parent, you will have safer teens. Read more on Examiner.

Friday, March 19, 2010

Sue Scheff: Girls and Violence

It is hard to accept when we realize our sweet angel we once rocked to sleep as an angel can become defiant, beligerent and downright mean.  Connect with Kids recently posted an excellent article on how girls are becoming more violent.

Source: Connect with Kids

Girls and Violence

“All that bad stuff is not going to take you anywhere...except you're going to be dead, in jail, or pregnant. Girls need to start doing something positive and think about your future.”

– Toni, 16 years old

Juvenile jails were once filled with boys and young men... but that's changing.

16 year old Toni says, "Girls are out there stealing, killing people, you know, doing all things that, you know, used to be just guys."

In fact Toni went to jail for possession of marijuana.

For the past decade, arrest rates for girls have been rising and new numbers from the federal government show that today one in four teenage girls has gotten into a serious physical fight, either at work or at school.

"More girls are getting involved in more violent activity," says Nina Hickson, a criminal court judge. "I think it's just a symptom of the society in which we live."

Experts say the culture has popularized a "bad girl image," a girl who's strong, aggressive, even violent, which is especially appealing if you want more attention.

Deputy Sheriff Kendrick Jones, says "They feel 'well, ok, I will develop a 'bad girl' attitude so I can fit in and I can get into this group and I can be the center of attention."

He says criminal justice personnel are far less lenient toward girls than years ago. He says today violent girls get arrested, indicted, tried in court and many end up in prison.

Judge Hickson has a recommendation for parents: "Monitor what's going on, stay in touch with the child.... get the child involved in positive activities."

It worked for Toni. She is now volunteering at a museum...with a brand new attitude.

"I started calling places to volunteer and I starting volunteering, and I was like, you know, hey, I'm doing something, I'm doing something positive... people need me."

Arrest Rates Up for Girls

According to statistics compiled by the American Bar Association (ABA), girls are the fastest growing segment of the juvenile justice population. The numbers are hard to dispute:

The federal data show that one in four girls has some involvement in violent behavior, sometimes with a weapon, compared to 33 percent of boys - a difference of just 6 percentage points.

On the surface these statistics seem to indicate dramatic increases in the number and seriousness of delinquent acts committed by girls. But what the statistics actually mean is being hotly debated. Are girls really becoming more violent, or are recent trends partially the result of the way juvenile arrests are now being categorized? As the ABA puts it: "Some experts have found that this growth is due in part not to a significant increase in violent behavior, but to the re-labeling of girls' family conflicts as violent offenses, the changes in police practices regarding domestic violence and aggressive behavior, the gender bias in the processing of misdemeanor cases, and, perhaps, a fundamental systemic failure to understand the unique developmental issues facing girls of today."

Tips for Parents
The causes of delinquency among girls are often different from that of boys. Research shows girls in the delinquency system have histories of physical, emotional and sexual abuse, have family problems, suffer from physical and mental disorders, have experienced academic failure, and succumb more easily to the pressures of domination by older males.

In a study by Leslie Acoca & Associates, No Place to Hide: Understanding and Meeting the Needs of Girls in the California Juvenile Justice System, researchers found girls in the juvenile justice system share many distinct characteristics:

■Family Fragmentation. Poverty, death, violence, and a multigenerational pattern of incarceration.
■Victimization Outside the Juvenile Justice System. Most girls in the system have a history of violent victimization.
■Victimization Inside the Juvenile Justice System. They become vulnerable to physical and sexual abuse similar to and sometimes worse than they experience in their homes and communities.
■Serious Physical and Mental Health Disorders.
■Widespread School Failure. The experience of educational failure is almost universal among delinquent girls interviewed.
■The Breaking Point—Early Adolescence. Girls appear to be most vulnerable to their first experiences of academic failure, pregnancy, juvenile justice system involvement and out-of-home placement between the ages of 12 and 15.
References
■American Bar Association
■National Criminal Justice Reference Service

Sunday, March 14, 2010

Sue Scheff: Improving Students Study Skills

Motivating students today can be a challenge. Many children are very bright, intelligent and have the ability to get excellent grades, however are underachievers. This can be extremely frustrating to parents as well as teachers.

PS Youth Outreach Center located in Lauderdale Lakes, offers Broward County youths an opportunity to learn better study skills, prepare for SAT's, ACT's as well as GED preparation. PS Youth also helps teens and young adults with career development by offering assistance with resume writing, interview tips, filling out applications and computer classes.

Paula Scott, President of PS Youth Outreach Center, said they are planning a Summer Camp which will also foster educational growth and retention during the summer months as well as incorporate some fun, educational activities. PS Youth's one-on-one tutoring rate is very low, in comparison to other tutoring and private educational services.

PS Youth Outreach Center, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which serves at-risk youth between the ages of 5-22 who reside in Broward County. The agency was founded in 2006 as a reaction to the numerous youth of Broward County who are under-served or unaware of the many services available.

Education is a privilege which many of our youth become discouraged to follow through with. Whether discouraged by social distractions, familial distractions, or simply a lack of guidance, these youth need to be helped through education.

PS Youth is approved by FDOE and the School Board of Broward County. Call today and learn more! 954-358-0625 or email at info@psyouth.org  . Are you able to sponsor a student or have school supplies to donate? Learn more, click here.

Read more on Examiner.

Be an educated parent, it can help your child reach their greatest potential.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Sue Scheff: Teens, Horses and Self-Esteem - Animal Assisted Therapy Program

Does your teenager (18 years old and up) have a passion for their pet? Do they enjoy helping others? If so, The Humane Society of Broward County offers a rewarding program. Animal Assisted Therapy Programs (AAT) is a rewarding experience for your teen and their companion animal.

First you will need to attend the Humane Society of Broward County's Volunteer Orientation. Volunteer Orientation is scheduled through their Volunteer Services Department at 954-266-6814.

The Animal Assisted Therapy Program (AAT) is not only for young adults; parents and people of all ages can help make a difference in many lives. If your teen is seeking a career in psychology, social work or veterinarian, this could be an excellent introduction. For adults, it is a great way to meet others that share your love of animals and helping others.

Once you have completed the Volunteer Orientation, you will be required to attend a 2 ½ hour AAT class without your animal. This class will teach you all about our Animal Assisted Therapy Program and what skill requirements both you and your animal must possess in order to be considered for our program.

After the AAT course is completed, you and your animal might require further training. Training is determined by the type of program you and your animal will be participating in, and what skill sets you and your animal have or need to have in order to participate. AAT Advanced Obedience Training classes are held at the Humane Society and are scheduled once a week for 6 weeks. The Manager of the AAT program will decide if you and your animal require further training before being evaluated for the program. - Humane Society of Broward County

If you are interested in joining AAT program, please contact the Humane Society directly at 954-266-6856 or email them at therapy@hsbroward.com  .


Not in Broward County? To find the nearest Humane Society near you, click here.

Watch slideshow and read more on Examiner.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Sue Scheff: Hoarding can start in the adolescence years

With the expansion of cable television, there doesn't seem to be a topic in reality shows that is missing. From 16 and Pregnant, to Intervention, to Hoarders, people are learning more about a variety of issues. More importantly, there is now an awareness that is helping others to understand disorders, addictions, challenges others are facing and a distinct mental health problem such as hoarding.

Hoarding can start in early adolescence. If not addressed, it can get progressively worse. Some of the symptoms can be:

  • Cluttered living spaces
  • Inability to discard items
  • Keeping stacks of newspapers, magazines or junk mail
  • Moving items from one pile to another, without discarding anything
  • Acquiring unneeded or seemingly useless items, including trash
  • Difficulty managing daily activities, including procrastination and rouble making decisions
  • Difficulty organizing items
  • Perfectionism
  • Excessive attachment to possessions, and discomfort letting others touch or borrow possessions
  • Limited or no social interactions
It's not clear what causes hoarding. Some researchers believe that hoarding occurs on a continuum - some people may simply be considered harmless pack rats, while others have a much more severe form of collecting that is life-threatening. The condition is more likely to affect those with a family history of hoarding, so genetics and upbringing are likely among the triggering factors.

Hoarding is currently considered a subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but this classification is under debate. Many mental health researchers argue that, while some people with OCD have hoarding behavior, hoarding is not specific to OCD. In fact, one study found that hoarding was no more likely to be associated with OCD than with other anxiety disorders. - Mayo Clinic

Some risk factors and features about hoarding that researchers have come to understand are associated with age, family history, stress factors, social isolation and perfectionism.

Help for hoarders is widespread today. Hoarding Cleanup is an nationwide service that offers resources of help. If you are in Florida, click here to find a local service near you.

Parents, start with your kid's bedrooms - encourage them to keep their rooms organized and if you notice that their room is becoming more than "just a messy room" take steps to find out why. Another red flag could be your child's locker at school. Check it out!

Be an educated parent, you will have safer and healthier teens.

Read more on Examiner.

Sunday, March 7, 2010

Sue Scheff: Underage Drinking - Talk to your Teens - Family Talk

Each year at this time, teens begin planning for some of the most memorable moments of their lives, including celebrating proms and graduations with friends and family. To help keep these celebrations safe for everyone, it¹s important to remind adults to encourage teens to celebrate safely and without alcohol.

According to the 2009 GfK Roper Youth Report, 68 percent of youth, ages 8 to 17, cite their parents as the number one influence on their decisions about whether they drink alcohol or not. In addition, government research shows that teens who report drinking usually get their alcohol from adults.

To help prevent underage drinking, the Family Talk program encourages open, honest communication between parents and children. Developed by an advisory panel of education, family counseling, child psychology and alcohol treatment professionals, Family Talk materials are distributed free to parents and educators by Anheuser-Busch and its national network of distributors.

These materials may be downloaded at http://www.familytalkonline.com/  in English and Spanish.

Progress is being made in the fight against underage drinking, by raising awareness and through sound educational programs and strong partnerships. In fact, 85 percent of adolescents, ages 12 to 17, are doing the right thing by not drinking, according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. In addition, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that teen drunk-driving fatalities have declined 34 percent since 2000.


Be an educated parent, you will have safer and healthier teens.

Read more on Examiner.

Friday, March 5, 2010

Sue Scheff: National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Parenting involves many more challenges and issues today than generations earlier. While years ago our parents concerns were with a teen getting pregnant or a form of STD such as Herpes, today there are many more serious concerns that both women and girls need to be aware of. This doesn't mean these issues didn't exist years ago, however it does mean we have come further in our education of knowledge and awareness.

March 10th is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD). This a nationwide initiative, coordinated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health to raise awareness of the increasing impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls. Read more about NWGHAAD.

When women are faced with HIV/AIDS, their physical health is not the only issue at hand. Often accompanying the physical illness associated with the virus are mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety.

The Office on Women's Health has two publications-one for health professionals and one for consumers-that focus on building positive awareness about women's mental health. They address environmental and cultural barriers to seeking help and suggest gender-appropriate strategies for recovery.

Order your free mental health publications for women today! Click here.

Be an educated parent, you will have healthier teens!

Read more on Examiner.

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Sue Scheff: Pediatric Depression - Is your teen depressed?

With the recent headlines of the suicide of Marie Osmond's son and TV teen actor of Growing Pains, Andrew Koenig, we are learning and hearing more about depression in children as well as a keen awareness to suicidal signs in our teens.

Do you suspect your child is suffering with depression? Are you concerned your teen is becoming more withdrawn, secretive, isolated? Childhood and teenage depression is often in hiding.

What is pediatric depression?

It's normal for children and teenagers to have sad or moody days, but when those feelings last for two weeks or longer, it could indicate that something more serious is going on. As adults, it can be hard for us to accept that children can also have depression, but research is going on now to help find new medicines for children with depression in the future.

If your child has been displaying one or more of these signs of depression for at least two weeks, and they are interfering with his/her ability to function, then he/she may be depressed and eligible to take part in this research:

  • Frequent sadness, or crying
  • Decreased interest in activities
  • Persistent boredom; low energy
  • Social isolation
  • Low self-esteem and guilt
  • Extreme sensitivity to rejection or failure
  • Increased irritability, anger, or hostility
  • Frequent absences from school or poor performance in school
  • Poor concentration
  • A major change in eating and/or sleeping patterns
  • Talk of, or efforts to run away from home
Source: Kids With Depression

Are you worried or concerned that your child or teen is struggling with depression? Visit http://www.kidswithdepression.com/ and learn more.

Learn more on Examiner.

Be an educated parent, you will have safer and healthier teens.

Monday, March 1, 2010

Sue Scheff: Depression, Suicide and Prevention

With the recent tragic news of the untimely death of Michael Blosil, 18 year-old son of Marie Osmond, combined with the suicide of Growing Pains TV actor, Andrew Koenig, alerts everyone that there are people that are suffering with serious depression which can reach to suicidal results.

The L.A. Times reported that Blosil had jumped from his downtown Los Angeles apartment at 9 p.m. Friday (February 26th) and had left a suicide note.

These recent sudden deaths that were not necessary, are a wake up call to people that may know someone that are suffering silently, or have become withdrawn. Especially with teens, parents need to be aware of warning signs.

Florida Initiative for Suicide Prevention (FISP) was founded by Jackie Rosen. Her son committed suicide 22 years ago and she has devoted her life to helping prevent others from going through this pain as well as educating people about the warning signs.

Depression is a major factor in the lives of our youth and young adults ages 10 to 24. In Broward County, the youngest child identified by the medical exam­iner to die of suicide due to depression was only 9 years of age. Every 43 sec­onds a teen in the USA age 15 to 18 has either planned a suicide or attempted a suicide due to feelings of helplessness and hopelessness.

On March 24, 2010 the 8th Annual Suicide Prevention Day at the Capitol, is a statewide event to promote education and raise awareness about suicide prevention. Visit Florida's Suicide Prevention Coalition.

Many thoughts and prayers are with people that have lost someone tragically to suicide. Especially to the Koenig and Osmond families, may they know we are all thinking of them.

Be an educated parent, friend, relative, grandparent and you could possibly save a life.

Read more on Examiner.