Sue Scheff: Teens and Dangerous Diet Websites

It is not a secret, being healthy is good for you. Society dictates that being thin is in, however we need to understand that being healthy is priority. Thin for one person may not be the same as it is for another.

Teenagers surf the net more than ever and what they are finding can be educational but it can also be harmful to their health. There are actually sites that promote anorexia and show your teens how to hide this deadly disorder.

Parents should also be aware of what their kids may be exposed to online - and the websites that promote dangerous and destructive dieting. The best Internet filter is the one that runs in teens' heads - not any filter a parent may install on a home computer. Talk with your children about dangerous and inappropriate sites and keep the lines of communication open so that they might come to you when they encounter destructive information and images online. - Connect with Kids

The National Eating Disorders Association offers these tips for kids on eating well and feeling good about themselves:
  • Eat when you are hungry. Stop eating when you are full.
  • All foods can be part of healthy eating. There are no "good" or "bad" foods, so try to eat lots of different foods, including fruits, vegetables, and even sweets sometimes.
  • When having a snack try to eat different types.
  • If you are sad or mad or have nothing to do-and you are not really hungry find something to do other than eating.
  • Remember: kids and adults who exercise and stay active are healthier and better able to do what they want to do, no matter what they weigh or how they look.
  • Try to find a sport or an activity that you like and do it! Join a team, join the YMCA, join in with a friend or even practice by yourself
Be an educated parent, you will have healthier and safer teens.

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